ddotdc

ddotdc:

An engineering field book manufactured in 1902 with sketches and notes from 1909. 

According to Paul Hoffman, DDOT project manager for Wards 3 and 4, the third image—featuring sketches of Chevy Chase Circle NW—show “C&P Co.” duct installation.

The fourth image is for manholes and manhole covers. Mr. Hoffman states that these manholes and manhole covers “was likely an improvement over all-brick manholes as vehicle weights (horse and wagons; streetcars; autos and trucks) increased.” According to Mr. Hoffman, the “I-Beams” in the roof of the manhole were used to support these increased vehicle weights and used a modern technology for the time (the steel reinforcing bar was just being patented around 1909). 

Please view full, high-resolution pages from the notebook.

dcpubliclibrary
dcpubliclibrary:

lauriehalseanderson:

They put my thoughts about censorship on a LIBRARY in Washington, DC!!!!
Absolute career highlight!! Thank you, kind librarians!

Thanks for the inspiration lauriehalseanderson!
You can find even more awesome art inside the building in celebration of Banned Books Week and the freedom to read, express and create as part of UNCENSORED: The Art Exhibition.

dcpubliclibrary:

lauriehalseanderson:

They put my thoughts about censorship on a LIBRARY in Washington, DC!!!!

Absolute career highlight!! Thank you, kind librarians!

Thanks for the inspiration lauriehalseanderson!

You can find even more awesome art inside the building in celebration of Banned Books Week and the freedom to read, express and create as part of UNCENSORED: The Art Exhibition.

14th Street and G Street NW, circa 1962-63.
Pedestrians cross 14th Street and G Street NW during a “Barnes Dance” pedestrian crossing, named after Henry Barnes, a traffic engineer who made the idea popular starting in the 1950s. During a Barnes Dance all traffic signals turn red for vehicles at an intersection, allowing pedestrians to cross in any direction they choose, including diagonally. This kind of pedestrian crossing is currently in place at a major intersection in the District: 7th Street and H Street NW in Gallery Place/Chinatown.
Learn more about the Gallery Place/Chinatown Barnes Dance crossing in this video.

14th Street and G Street NW, circa 1962-63.

Pedestrians cross 14th Street and G Street NW during a “Barnes Dance” pedestrian crossing, named after Henry Barnes, a traffic engineer who made the idea popular starting in the 1950s. During a Barnes Dance all traffic signals turn red for vehicles at an intersection, allowing pedestrians to cross in any direction they choose, including diagonally. This kind of pedestrian crossing is currently in place at a major intersection in the District: 7th Street and H Street NW in Gallery Place/Chinatown.

Learn more about the Gallery Place/Chinatown Barnes Dance crossing in this video.

A series of picture maps of the Washington Metropolitan Region, created for the official bicentennial celebration of the American Revolution (1776-1976). Dated 1975. 

Please view a full, high-resolution version of the map.

Image 2: This section of the document gives an overview of the District, as well as listing information about different Metrobus stops and the in-progress Metrorail (which opened in March 1976, just before the bicentennial). 

Image 3: The section gives an up-close look at different sections of the city and inner-ring suburbs, including: Georgetown, Dupont Circle, Southwest, Capitol Hill, and Old Town Alexandria. These special sections point out landmarks such as Howard University, the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and Rock Creek Park. It also provides information on famous buildings such as the Willard Hotel, the Old Post Office, and the British Embassy. 

Image 4: The inset provides historical details about the District and the surrounding region: including a graph that charts the city’s population growth and facts about the National Mall and the March on Washington in 1963.

"Getting Around Washington by Bicycle,” dated August 1982.

This guide, prepared by the D.C. Department of Transportation’s Office of Policy and Program Development, provided information for cyclists about navigating through the District. The guide provides basic information about the city’s special bikeways, details the hazards of particular bridges and informs readers about rental businesses and cycling societies.

Included with the guide were eight small maps, which when laid out together show bike paths and suggested routes through the majority of the city. We’ll share these maps soon.

For a PDF of the guide, please visit: 

http://ddot.dc.gov/publication/getting-around-washington-bicycle

Interesting note: According to the guide, bicycles were only permitted on Metrorail on the weekends, with a permit (see Page 30).